Miguel Morris has always loved sports, and had dreamed of making it into a career, maybe as an agent or a team executive. In college he managed the basketball team, which only made his dream of working in sports stronger. Always on the lookout for ways to get more experience and stay involved in sports, Miguel eagerly signed up when he heard about Coaching Corps.

He began coaching football at the UA House at Fayette, in Baltimore, and was immediately changed. Miguel had been concerned that coaching wasn’t for him, that he didn’t have the temperament for coaching. After all he doesn’t like to yell, and prefers to deal with things quietly and individually. Training with Coaching Corps, however, showed him that he was perfectly suited to coach. “There’s just so many ways to lead. You don’t have to be vocal and yell to teach the kids, and Coaching Corps taught me that” Miguel says about the training.

In fact, Miguel thinks players respect you more if you don’t yell. “I try to teach them patience, perseverance, and integrity. I need to show them how to do those things, that way they can see it in me and copy that.”

Coaching football not only helped him develop his leadership skills, but he found he got immense joy from developing one-on-one relationships with his players. “I just love talking with them, establishing this relationship, and helping them grow. Seeing them grow, and seeing them now come to me for advice not just about football, but for things off the court, that’s my favorite thing about coaching” says Miguel.

He loved it so much that he is using his pursuit of a PhD in Sports Leadership to start a non-profit in Baltimore where he can help young athletes pursue not just sports, but a quality education, and sees the UA House as an example of how to do that. “It’s had such an impact on the community. It’s meeting the needs of people not just with sports, but with classes, even farmers markets. It’s created this family atmosphere in the community that’s amazing.”



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